Like the circles that you find

Sometimes when I'm trying to fall asleep, I know I'n succeeding because I catch myself thinking things that make no sense. It isn't long after that point that I'm out like a light, and my brain starts repairing itself.

Less often, I get the same kind of feeling even when I'm alert, upright, and wide awake.

Like now. All of a sudden I'm thinking of these two guys, for no reason whatsoever:


What does this mean? It must be quarantine-related. Somebody, call me, let's do a master's thesis. Or a psychiatry research paper. I have Killebrew-Spahn Syndrome (KSS).

Comments

  1. Two of the most underrated stars of baseball for that era. Yes, HOF members, but totally unrecognized for their talents because they played in Washington / Twin Cities and Milwaukee. If these guys were Yankee's, move over Mickey Mantle and Whitey Ford!
    Not sure if this has a Rorschach Ink Blot test to describe it, I would lean towards the middle child syndrome of not getting any recognition. ("Marsha, Marsha, Marsha!")

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    1. Killebrew was very well known back in the day and was one of the biggest stars. I just think that like a lot of sports stars unless you were ultra flashy and/or a record breaker once you retired and away from the game for a decade or so fans tend to forget you. Except for the people in the towns that they played in and sports junkies.

      How many young baseball players today know about the Steve Garvey’s and the Joe Morgan’s? Likely not too many.

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    2. Boomer nostalgia. I got it too. Bad. Only for me it's the 1971 Orioles with their four 20-game winners, and the human vacuum cleaner, Brooks Robinson.

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  2. Well Jack have you ever found yourself seeking out Mark Fidrych interviews late at night or any and all documentaries about either Sandy Koufax, Willie Mays, or Bob Gibson? Well if you have you have the bug just like me LOL!

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    1. When I turned 18 I hitchhiked all over America. Coming down the West Coast I stopped at Stanford and visited some friends of mine. I suggested we go to Candlestick for something truly historic. It was a Giants baseball game and in the late innings they pinch hit with a batter at the end of his career who got up and struck out. No big deal, right? It was Willie Mays.

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  3. Every time I see something about Warren Spahn, it's like Pavlov's dogs. "Spahn and Sain and pray for rain" starts off in my head. That's one of those thoroughly baseball things. I was really sad this week when Dick Allen died without the pricks that run and vote for the HOF bestirring their smug selves to recognize his greatness. He had the nerve to be himself when that wasn't allowed for black men in baseball, or in the larger society, and it was held over him his whole life. Or as teammate Mike Schmidt said:

    “Dick was a sensitive Black man who refused to be treated as a second-class citizen… [negative] labels have kept Dick Allen out of the Hall of Fame. Imagine what Dick could’ve accomplished as a player in another era, on another team, left alone to hone his skills, to be confident, to come to the ballpark every day and just play baseball.” Cribbed from a great article looking at Allen's career at: https://blogs.fangraphs.com/reckoning-with-dick-allen-1942-2020/

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  4. Cary - the Spahn and Sain quote reminds me of Tanana and Ryan and three days of cryin' and Clemens, Hurst expect the worst. Love all those sayings. RIP Dick Allen. That man could crush a ball.

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